Posts Tagged ‘painting’

Momma’s Little Helper

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

Sadly, we won’t be listing the house this week.  We tried everything and gave it our all, but mother nature gave us a smackdown.  Oliver brought home some nice little germies from his new preschool and we’ve been running a sick house all weekend.   Oliver bounced back after a couple days, but poor Evelyn is still snotty and congested.  Barry is getting run down and I’ve been sneezing my head off all day. 

We’ve kept Evelyn in a little hoodie to keep her warm.  She is too cute, even when she’s sick!

To make up for lost time, I put Oliver to work painting the shed today.  He loved it!  He was totally absorbed for 45 minutes straight and only stopped when I made him go inside for lunch.

He was very careful not to spill his paint and even let the excess drip off his brush into his cup without being told to do so.  He kept the paint off the bricks and didn’t get too much on himself.

While I finished one side, I sent Oliver to start on the next side.  He was actually painting all by himself!  I should have put him to work about 6 weeks ago…

Tonight, I finished painting the front porch ceiling, rails, floor, and steps.  I also finished the doors for the base cabinet, got 2 loads of laundry done and did the dishes.  Too bad house work won’t sell the house! 

The realtor will be out on Friday to guide us through the weekend.  We plan to list next week.   Our task list is shrinking and we are down to the little things now.  I just hope I don’t get too sick or we are sunk.  Cross your fingers everyone!

Painting Ceilings

Friday, July 1st, 2011

Not a single person who has come into our house since we have painted the ceilings has noticed that we painted the ceilings.  However, they have commented on how big the place looks and how bright it is. It could be that we have finally gotten rid of enough “stuff” to make the place look bigger OR it could be that we’ve gotten rid of the grimy, dingy, grey ceiling that was holding us down.

We didn’t have a clue how we would paint the cathedral ceiling until we spotted an awesome extendable pole at Lowes.  We didn’t even extend it it’s full length!  (Um Dad, just how tall did we think our ceilings were?)

We hit the dining room, kitchen and living room in the same night.  We taped off the walls with plastic sheeting as we went.  We also piled as much as we could in the center of the room and threw another plastic sheet over that.  We did pretty good with the splatter control, especially later in the night when the roller was super saturated and paint was dripping off it in big gobs.  As you can see, it was past midnight when we did the living room and well into 2am until we finished the main parts.  I have to follow up later and cut in around the edges.

Can you believe the color difference!  We used Valspar, Ultra Premium, Interior Finish Eggshell in Ultra White 72322.  The living room alone took about 2 gallons.  Popcorn ceilings have a greater surface area than a smooth ceiling with all those nooks and crannies to fill.  Talk about a pain in the butt to paint.  The Eggshell finish does have a very slight sheen, which reflects light beautifully.  This is a big plus as we don’t have much natural light in our house to brighten things up.

In some areas, the popcorn started peeling off the ceiling and sticking to the roller.  You have to immediately stop, lighten the pressure and carefully roll/pull the brush off.  Load the brush back up with paint and roll it on in one direction only using very light pressure.  Roll in the direction that goes against the peeled up popcorn, like you were smoothing it back down.  If it starts coming off in large amounts, stop ASAP and let the area dry 110%.  Come back after the area has dried and follow the tips from above or use a paint brush and dab paint on the area.

We had thought about hiring someone else to come in and paint for us, but once we got organized it was a breeze.  We saved a ton of money and it was easier than we thought.

Here’s the list of supplies that we used for painting the ceiling:

* Roller brush appropriate for ceiling texture – the thicker the nap, the better it can handle popcorn ceilings.
* Roller brush tray and roller brush frame.
* Some sort of extension pole to screw into the end of the brush frame.
* A ladder to help you cut in the edge of the ceiling along the wall.
* A hat to keep the paint flecks and splotches off your head.
* Plastic sheeting out the wazzo to protect your floor, furniture, TV, walls, etc…
* Blue painter’s tape to hold the plastic sheeting in place.
* A 2 inch paint brush or angled trim brush to cut in the edges of the ceiling where it joins the wall and to work around light fixtures, etc…
* Paint.  A latex is easy to clean.  An eggshell finish gives off a very subtle “glow”.  (The matte ceiling paint seemed to suck light away and looked dark.)  If you have popcorn ceiling you will need more paint than you think to get the job done (ie. one gallon for the master bedroom).

Anyone out there have tips to share from your own ceiling endeavors? 

Clean Up Your Inside Doors With Paint

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

You never know just how grimy your house is until you start painting.  Once one area is fresh and clean the rest of the house screams – Paint Me!  It’s no surprise that the doors, which are some of the grimiest, scuffed up, and well used surfaces of the house, need a fresh coat of paint too.  With little effort, you can save money and do it yourself.  No need to buy new doors or hire someone else to help out.

Yesterday, the hubby set up a paint station for me out back.  We have 8 internal doors total.  He took off the hinges and the door knobs and let me loose.  TIP: Use a permanent marker and write on each door what room it came from.  Write in the space cut out for the hinge so you can see it after the door has been painted.

The first chore was to sand every surface of the door to 1) roughen the door so the new paint will stick and 2) remove loose and peeling paint.   For my purposes, sanding also served to clean the door.  Otherwise, you would need to wash the door down so the new paint will stick better.

If you are doing one or two doors, by all means use sandpaper and do it by hand.  If you are doing multiple doors (like, 8 of them) then do yourself a favor and beg, borrow or steal a random orbital sander or  you’ll be sanding those doors until the cows come home.  (To all my kleptomaniac fans, 2 Pennies does not advocate the stealing of sanders in any way.)

Orbital sanders are relatively inexpensive as far as power tools go.  I used a little $30 el cheapo Black and Decker sander for 10 years, before it went to tool heaven.  The hubby went with a more expensive replacement, because he wanted more power (don’t they all?).  It still works the same to me.

I used a white Valspar semi-gloss latex for the doors to make it pOp and because a semi-gloss finish is easier to clean.  I rolled the paint on with a roller meant for super smooth surfaces.  For the best finish, you need at least 2 thin, even coats.  I don’t care what the advertisments say, I have yet to use a paint that only took one coat. 

When I came back to do a second coat, I discovered a flaw in our brilliant paint setup – trees and other debris.  Most every door had some sort of gunk on it from pine needles to bird poop.  The hubby had to string up a tarp to protect my finish.  After a second first coat, we were back in business…until the thunderstorm.

By the third day, I was able to finish 5 doors 100%.  I was outside working on the last 3 (see pic above) when a storm rolled in.  Not only did it roll in, but it stayed for 5 days. 

The tarp was able to keep debris off my doors, but it collapsed under the weight of the rain.  I managed to haul in 2 half finished doors, but the 3rd door bit the dust.

With the hinges and knobs replaced, the new doors look spiffy indeed.  We can’t help but marvel at how clean they look!  I still have 3 doors to finish, but considering I’m juggling packing, moving, and kiddos I think I’ll be okay.

TIP: If you went through the trouble to take the door off the hinges to paint, you might as well paint the door trim before you put the new door back up.

Tips and Tricks for painting an interior door:

1) Remove hinges, knobs, hooks, and other items attached to your door.  Write which door goes where on the door itself in the space where the hinge attaches.

2) Setup a well ventilated workspace that is protected from the environment.

3) Wash or sand the door to prep it for paint.  Use a 120 grit sandpaper for the first run and then 220 to smooth everything out.  Random orbital sanders rock. 

4) Roll on your paint with a smooth surface paint roller.  Brushes will leave too many marks.  You may use either the roller or a brush for the edges.  Be careful not to paint over your door markings in the hinge area.  Also, be careful not to goop up paint in the hinge cutout or your hinges won’t fit properly.  Give it at least 2 coats and dry thoroughly before flipping door over.

5) Reinstall hardware and bingo – you have a nice and clean door!

Paint the Front Door

Sunday, May 29th, 2011

Another tip for selling your house – give your door a fresh coat of paint (typically a red paint color).

 Our entire door, side panel, and trim have been a dark green since the day I bought the house in Feb 2000.  How green was it?  See the side panel?  You can still see the green showing through after 5 coats of color blocking primer. 

You can search online for the “proper” way to paint a door – trust me, there is a method.  Everything depends on if your door is wood or metal, if the original paint job is in good shape or if it is peeling, if there are cracks or repairs that need to be made, etc… 

For me, the metal door is in fairly good condition and the thick green paint is in great condition.  The hubby removed the door knob, locks, and pins from the hinges.  He put the door on a pair of sawhorses for me in the shade of a tree.  I knew I wanted a type of red for the door, but fire engine or lipstick red weren’t for me.  The house is clay, the porch is a medium brown and the trim is white.  I decided on a reddish brown for the door and the shutters.  To be exact, it is called Thomas Jefferson Brown and it is a historical color.  I figured if it’s lasted this long, then it’s got to be good!

As far as technique goes, I lightly sanded the surface to remove the gloss and then I painted all the trim and panels first with a 2 – 3 inch brush.  I worked horizontally on all pieces and then vertically.  Same goes for the rails and stiles.  The rails are the horizontal parts of the door and the stiles run vertically.  Where they meet, I feathered the edges with a light touch and then I hit the edges of the door.  I did not bother to tape off the windows as I will use a razor to scrape the paint off after the door has cured.  Helpful tip: Load up your brush with paint and use long, smooth strokes for an even finish.

I started this process very early in the morning and let the paint dry for about 2 hours between coats.  I would have liked a longer drying time, especially since I needed 4 coats of paint for thorough coverage, but we managed. 

By the time the door was reinstalled, it was 830pm and I still hadn’t gotten to the trim.  I grabbed my quart of Kilz premium color and stain blocking primer and finally zapped the green for good!  I will have to do another coat tomorrow morning, but wow – does it look sharp tonight!

I must admit to having bittersweet feelings about our remodeling job.  Now that the green is gone, it looks and feels like a totally different house.  For as much as we didn’t like the old exterior, it suited us.  Now things are starting to look very fancy around here.  I guess momma has got to buy a new pair of shoes!

Painting the House: Picking a Color

Monday, April 11th, 2011

Our house is falling apart, literally.  We have ants and birds duking it out in the chimney, bees and wasps gang fighting for our deck, and mold silently creeping over every board.  Now that the baby making is out of the way, we are ready to take care of our poor house.

First off, the old colors need to go.  Ugh – yellow-white siding with green trim?  I’ve lived here for 11 years and I’ve never liked that color combo. 

Next, we need to decide which is more cost effective:  Replacing the rotted siding/rebuilding the chimney and painting or putting up vinyl siding. 

The first contractor we called said it would be far cheaper to paint than to side.  He said we have a lot of odd surface area for a house our size and that there would be alot of waste if we sided.  He is going to give us a quote for both this week.

The second contractor we called gave us a quote for vinyl siding only and he came in at $7,200.

The third contractor is coming tomorrow to do a quote for both painting and vinyl. 

Being that painting might be cheaper than siding, we went to Lowe’s to pick out our colors.

We’ve narrowed down the selection to the following:

Main body color:
A) Polished Silver
B) Woodlawn Colonial Gray

Porch, deck, shutters: 
C) Iron Frost
D) Almost Charcoal
E) Sienna

Trim:
White

What do you guys think???  What are your color preferences? 

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